Category: Diary

Gender Neutral Preschooler

I was doing face painting.

Preschoolers around age 3–5 were coming over and asking for…

A Butterfly, said the first little girl. She’d been a butterfly before, so she asked for what she knew.

A Bunny, said a little girl, who saw the pictures on my table (example face-painting pictures of bunnies and Easter eggs).

Then several little boys came over and asked to be a Bunny. I painted them exactly the same as the picture – pink and white ears, black whiskers, pink nose.

Then another volunteer sat down next to me, offering to help with the face painting, because the queue of kids was growing.

A Bunny, said a little boy. The other volunteer painted the pink parts of the bunny in blue, instead.

A Tiger, said a little boy who was in front of me. He’d been a tiger before, so he asked for what he knew.

The next few boys who came over wanted to be Tigers.

A boy wanted to be a Cheetah.
A girl wanted to be a Cheetah.

A boy sat down in front of the other volunteer and he didn’t know what to choose. She suggested a tiger, painted his face, and said, “Oh, you look so aggressive!”

It all starts here, baby.

2018 Resolutions

Oh, howdy!

I’ve been focusing on staring at my kids (not really), making videos, and messing around with pencils and paint. I haven’t prioritised The Bloog. But, I always like doing the resolutions thing! So here are my 2018s:

 


 

DAILY

  • art journal
  • meditation
  • kindness

WEEKLY

  • monaco video

MONTHLY*

  • 12 books
  • 12 movies
  • 12 travels

OVERALL

  • follow your curiosity
  • make the time to do it interestingly

 


 

I think I’ll find the “12 movies” the hardest one to do. I’m bad at watching movies and TV shows.

I talk more about my resolutions in the latest Monaco Video!

 


 

* 12? – well, that is to say, one per month. One book, one movie, and one travel (AKA “get out more!”) per month.

Exit Survey

When I first learned about exit surveys, I thought they were a brilliant idea. At the place where I worked, I felt like * so * much * energy * was put into getting new staff and new customers, and if just a bit of work was put into retaining staff/customers, life would be much cooler for everyone. We had a high turnover of staff, and so when I heard that exit surveys had been implemented as part of the leaving process for staff, I thought: “Aha! Nobody listened to my feedback, but now they will have to listen to all the people who are leaving, and maybe things will change!”

Nothing really changed. It wasn’t until I quit the company that I realised exit surveys for staff don’t get truthful results because:

a) you don’t want to burn bridges,

b) you don’t want to waste any more of your precious time on a company that didn’t value you (therefore, write “I am leaving because I was interested in other opportunities” and be done with it!),

c) you just don’t care anymore – if they didn’t listen to you before, why tell them the same things in the exit survey? and,

d) the problems at the company are so big, you can’t answer a question like “What, if improved, would have caused you to stay at the organisation?” without your head exploding.

But the idea stayed in my mind. Over the years, sometimes when I’ve decided to stop giving a company my custom, I’ve remembered the concept of the exit survey, and thought about how so many companies must be unaware of why they lose customers. I was just thinking about this today, as I’ve decided to try a new hairdresser and I was thinking: the other one will never know why I stopped coming. Maybe they don’t care, maybe they have enough customers, who knows!

In other news, I’ve been busy with my kids and making art and YouTube videos.

See you later, alligator. 🐊