Exit Survey

When I first learned about exit surveys, I thought they were a brilliant idea. At the place where I worked, I felt like * so * much * energy * was put into getting new staff and new customers, and if just a bit of work was put into retaining staff/customers, life would be much cooler for everyone. We had a high turnover of staff, and so when I heard that exit surveys had been implemented as part of the leaving process for staff, I thought: “Aha! Nobody listened to my feedback, but now they will have to listen to all the people who are leaving, and maybe things will change!”

Nothing really changed. It wasn’t until I quit the company that I realised exit surveys for staff don’t get truthful results because:

a) you don’t want to burn bridges,

b) you don’t want to waste any more of your precious time on a company that didn’t value you (therefore, write “I am leaving because I was interested in other opportunities” and be done with it!),

c) you just don’t care anymore – if they didn’t listen to you before, why tell them the same things in the exit survey? and,

d) the problems at the company are so big, you can’t answer a question like “What, if improved, would have caused you to stay at the organisation?” without your head exploding.

But the idea stayed in my mind. Over the years, sometimes when I’ve decided to stop giving a company my custom, I’ve remembered the concept of the exit survey, and thought about how so many companies must be unaware of why they lose customers. I was just thinking about this today, as I’ve decided to try a new hairdresser and I was thinking: the other one will never know why I stopped coming. Maybe they don’t care, maybe they have enough customers, who knows!

In other news, I’ve been busy with my kids and making art and YouTube videos.

See you later, alligator. 🐊

Four Tet – New Energy

I’ve loved Four Tet for a long time. This new record is beautiful, again, again.

Only a few tracks are free here, but hopefully you have Apple Music or something and can listen to the rest.

Vlog Project (Monaco Video!)

At some point in my chats with Michelle – via letter? email? carrier pigeon? – we mentioned how we’d love to try making videos or podcasts. Michelle then said, OK Fox, I’m up for this idea! Let’s do something!  But at the time, I was burnt out from working on a business idea that was stuck in the mud and I said, Gimme August to think about it.

I asked her if there were any women doing videos like the Vlogbrothers, and she couldn’t think of anyone.

Then during August, I went on holiday and sent Michelle a postcard, where, on the spur of the moment, I wrote about maybe sending each other video letters (vletters?!).

Hilarity ensued.

I’ve been enjoying the project sooo much. Watching Michelle’s videos, making my own ones, even editing. I thought I was find editing really hard and incredibly boring, but I haven’t! I think I love working in an area where I know nothing, and I have so much to learn. Happy dance.

Welcome to our vlog project (aka THE RETURN OF MONACO VIDEO).

 

Monaco Video

Doing Not Thinking

I have changed tack entirely on what-to-do-next. For several years now I’ve been reading all these books, seeking knowledge and advice: How can I work out what to do next? I like doing UX, but I don’t want to continue with the same kind of work. Do I keep on with UX? Change to something else? I analysed my skills, strengths, weaknesses, and what I have and haven’t enjoyed doing in the past. I desperately sought my passion. I told the concept of passion to “Go to your room!” and instead considered what I could do to best help others. I brainstormed “fun ideas.” I worked on an online business idea and products. I read more books and advice. I did exercises like imagining myself in 17 different careers (in parallel universes), analysing what I liked and didn’t like about each one, and “bad ideas” exercises, like imagining myself in wildly inappropriate careers, then looking at the opposite of those careers.

Years.

I’m currently reading Tools of Titans, which contains very varied life advice (and very particular advice) from about 200 people who are considered experts in their fields. It’s not a book I’d usually read, but I’ve been trying to read more diversely. I’ve also been reading 80,000 Hours, a fantastic website that’s chockablock with well-researched career help and information. A couple of days ago, I came across this advice (I believe it was in the book or the website, but now I can’t find the direct quote, damnit!) about how you can’t figure out what to do by thinking about it – a zillion books and a zillion analysis sessions won’t help you – you have to learn what to do by doing.

So I’m going to give myself a break from feeling like I absolutely suck for not having figured this stuff out, and I’m going to try doing completely different things, so long as I’m visibly doing (something I’ve found I need, to do things thoroughly – is to keep a visual record of what I’m doing).

Cheers!

 

The Most Beautiful and Best of Times

This is super random, but my gosh. To state the bleedin’ obvious, I love my kids so much. It’s so stupid that I get to worrying about whatIreallywanttodoforwork and howIwillspendmytimein10years and whatcareersshouldItryonforsize and stuff, when, really, I am in the Best of Times. The most beautiful and best of times.

I spent my twenties being 99% sure that a) I’d never find an amazing loved+loving partner and b) I’d never have children. I didn’t want children! I wasn’t interested at all. As time went on and I saw vague acquaintances share photos of their kids on the socials, I couldn’t relate at all. I found those photos and updates sooooo boring. It was like seeing cat photo after cat photo. “Oh, you think your kid did a funny thing! No. Every single person who has a kid thinks that kinda thing is cute or funny. It ain’t!”

Then, of course, I find someone and make the babies and share all the photos and the updates and think they’re oh so wonderful. Yup. Now I’m annoying the heck out of someone else.

Kit’s (almost 3) favourite things at the moment are EVERYTHING and sleeping, cuddles, hanging out with my brother, playing LEGO/marble run/dominoes/play-doh/Hungry Hippos, going to the local park and shops and playground and cafe for a banana milkshake, running and jumping, moving furniture around like it’s a jungle gym, reading books, singing, watching Olobob Top, conversing, eating. // We call his sister “Skybaby” and so Kit’s taken to calling himself “Kitlittleboy.” // He stopped daytime-napping for one pure month (this kid who loves sleep so much?! I couldn’t believe it!) and then, a week ago, outta nowhere, started naps again. “Mama, I’m going to have a little rest now, and I’ll have a big rest later,” he says, and asks me to leave his room. “I’m already tucked in.” // He was talking to my mum the other day about “what the neighbour-doors do” and after a while, she figured out that he was trying to say “the neighbours next door”. He’s full on, full of love, very frustrating sometimes, needs a lotta love, and he’s adorable.

Sky’s (1.5) favourite things at the moment are EVERYTHING and playing with every toy, going anywhere, any music/singing/dancing, most foods, terrorising the dog, stealing my phone and running off with glee, playing with LEGO, clapping when she’s happy, shaking her head for “No,” yelling “AH AH AH” for “Yes,” and saying “dog,” “bath,” and “car.” She’s full on, full of love, hasn’t reached the frustrating stage yet, needs a lotta love, and she’s adorable.

Lotsa love.

 

 

  

 
(Marble run!)